Sounddogs Animals Sound Effects Library

Sounddogs Animals Sound Effects Library

  • The Sounddogs Animal Sounds Archive features a collection of 999 animal sounds from the Rob Nokes, Sounddogs and Soundelux Sound Libraries: snorting, grunting, hissing, hissing, bleating, growling, barking, yapping, meowing, cackling, lolling, licking, smacking - of cows, dogs , Alligators to dolphins and yaks.
  • How to make sound recordings of animals - Watch Rob Nokes, the owner of Sounddogs, how he record animals

Sounddogs Animal Sound Effects Library

Sounddogs Animals Sound Effects

The Sounddogs Animal Sounds Archive contains 999 sounds and noises from animals like alligators, buffalos, bulls, cows, cats and even yaks.

The Animal Sounds Archive from Sounddogs is a unique and exclusive collection of animal sounds culled from Rob Nokes' personal archive (Nokes is the founder and owner of Sounddogs). With the Sounddogs Animal Sounds Archive, Rob presents us with his best animal recordings, conveniently compiled into a compact archive. Rob invites us to swim with orcas and sea lions, join a pack of hyenas in the desert and even hang out in a pig sty.

The Sounddogs Animal Sounds Archive contains 999 recordings in fully mixed sound quality (from 24bit/48kHz to High Definition 24bit/96kHz).

Sounddogs - Animals is a Sounddogs product.

sounddogs/Sounddogs - Animals Sound Effects Library Demo
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Track: Sounddogs - Animals Audio Demo | Sounddogs - Animals | © by Sounddogs

Overview of Sounddogs - Animals

This overview lists the sound effects categories of the Sounddogs Sounddogs - Animals according to the original track list. This list is based on the original metadata from the products sound files and allows a simple and easy way to import the files into your sound library administration software like Soundminer.

The Soundminer programs offer comprehensive tools and features for a modern workflow to administrate, search, find and transfer soundfiles directly to your editing system. Never heard of it? Read more about the industry-standard production system Soundminer and why it will make your editing day faster and easier than ever before!

Sounddogs - Animals, by download contains 55 categories

  • Alligators
  • Alpacas
  • Animals
  • Animals Barnyard
  • Animals Wild
  • Australian Cattle Dog
  • Bats
  • Beagle
  • Bears
  • Bgs
  • Birds
  • Buffalo Bison
  • Bull
  • Bulls
  • Cats
  • Chickens
  • Chihuahua
  • Cows
  • Dogs
  • Dogs Jack Russell
  • Fish
  • Foley
  • Frogs
  • Goats
  • Golden Retriever
  • Hippos
  • Hyenas
  • Labrador
  • Orangatan
  • Ostrich Ostriches
  • Pandas
  • Pigs
  • Pigsgiant
  • Rats
  • Reindeers
  • Rhinos
  • Rodents
  • Rooster
  • Saint Bernard
  • Sea Mammals
  • Sea Mammals Dolphins
  • Sea Mammals Whales
  • Sheep
  • Snakes
  • Tigers
  • Tigers And Lions
  • Various
  • Various Others
  • Weiner
  • Wild
  • Yaks
  • Zebra
  • Zebra
  • Zebra Attached Mic Ecu

This list is merely an overview. Please consult the Sounddogs - Animals track sheet for more information and a complete overview of all the recordings.

Sounddogs Animals - The Animal Sound Effects Library

Sounddogs Sound Recording of a bear - Sounddogs records a bear
Image: Sounddogs Sound Recording of a bear

The Sounddogs Animal Sounds Archive contains 999 sounds and noises from animals like alligators, buffalos, bulls, cows, cats and even yaks.

The Animal Sounds Archive from Sounddogs is a unique and exclusive collection of animal sounds culled from Rob Nokes' personal archive (Nokes is the founder and owner of Sounddogs). With the Sounddogs Animal Sounds Archive, Rob presents us with his best animal recordings, conveniently compiled into a compact archive. Rob invites us to swim with orcas and sea lions, join a pack of hyenas in the desert and even hang out in a pig sty.

The Sounddogs Animal Sounds Archive contains 999 recordings in fully mixed sound quality (from 24bit/48kHz to High Definition 24bit/96kHz).

Sounddogs - Dog sounds

Sounddogs Animal Sound Library: Dogs wearing microports to record sounds
Image: Sounddogs recording with dogs - dogs waring microports

The name Sounddogs already hints at the fact that the Sounddogs Animal Sounds Archive offers a comprehensive selection of dog sounds. Not only does Rob like dogs, he also knows that they play a big part in many movies.

The Sounddogs Animal Sounds Archive contains all sorts of barking and yapping sounds, but also a wealth of other canine noises: sniffing, snorting, panting, howling, begging, grunting, whimpering as well as various other dog-related sounds.

How to record dog sounds

Rob Nokes managed to record some truly impressive dog sounds for his archives, a selection of which can be heard on the Sounddogs Animal Sounds Archive. But you can now access an even greater collection of dog sounds in the Avosound Online Sound Archive or the Sounddogs Sound Archive.

If you want to make sound recordings of dogs, you'll have to be quite inventive. Dogs rarely sit still enough to reveal their sonic secrets. So let's take a closer look at how the sounds of dogs and other animals are recorded. If you happen to have a dog or a cat yourself, you'll find plenty of interesting information here to help you capture your pet's daily feeding frenzy for eternity.

Recording animal sounds

Sounddogs sound effects recording from a falcon bird
Image: Rob Nokes records a falcon

Animals have quite a range of sounds that are not only important in sound editing but also very useful for sound designers when creating new sounds. Recording animal noises and voices is an art in itself and requires lots of experience and patience. As much as we love animals, they are not always the most cooperative species––particularly in regard to sound recordings. An animal does not necessarily care to make noises into a microphone––nor does it necessarily know what a microphone even is. It is more likely to nibble on your windshield, play around with you or even try to eat you (depending on what animal it is).

Clearly, a few special tricks are in order...

Of easy and difficult animals

It must also be said that some animals are more difficult to deal with than others. Some animals can be trained while others just require a lot of patience. Luck and patience are required on the job anyway––and a bit of food can work wonders with the former.

In this article, we will take a closer look at the recording of dog sounds. Dogs are probably among the easier animals to record, mainly because they can be trained for such a task (unlike cats or guinea pigs). Also, the name Sounddogs hints at a very special canine connection.

Animal sound recording: interior or exterior?

If possible, try to make sound recordings of animals outdoors. This is mainly due to the reflective nature of rooms that can have a heavy influence on the recordings. This type of recording can no longer be used in an exterior scene, as the room tone will create the wrong acoustic impression of the location.

If you would like to make recordings of dogs, you should look for a quiet place outdoors. Please note that anything you can hear at the location (e.g. airplanes, crickets, birds, traffic) will later also be present in the recording. If you are recording loud noises (e.g. barking), you won't notice the background noise so much, but if you're capturing quiet action (e.g. walking, panting or breathing) you might find that the recording is unusable.

Please click here for more information about sound recording including tips and tricks.

Sound recordings of dogs - Sounddogs Video

This Sounddogs video might be a bit shaky but it gives good insight into Rob Nokes' process of recording dogs noises.

You can also see why recording animals requires a great deal of luck. Sometimes the animal is irritated when someone else gives orders. Sometimes the dog just doesn't feel like it, or doesn't understand the task at hand. This is also evident in the Sounddogs video where Rob's dog, NAME, doesn't seem to understand what's going on.

In such a case, you need a lot of patience...or, possibly, a different dog.

Sounddogs Video: Rob Nokes records sounds from dogs

The Sounddogs Video - Recording dog sounds

Rob made sure to pick a quiet place outdoors. He generally uses a directional microphone, because there is a road in the background. The directional microphone is useful when there is a noise source behind the sound recordist. Rob stands next to the dog with a second microphone, trying to capture the barking as directly as possible.

The dog's owner and/or trainer stands behind the microphones, so the sound of their rustling clothes won't also be captured. The dog is supposed to sit or stand, but not walk around; we want the animal to bark as directly as possible into the microphone (like an opera singer!).

After the dog has been briefed, the (hopefully successful) recording can begin ;-)

Here's a helpful tip: unlike other animals, dogs can be trained to bark on command. Make sure to ask the owner if their dog can bark on command, because it might help you find the right animal.

Recording a tiger

Needless to say, working with predatory animals is extremely dangerous. A dog might bite you when provoked, but a tiger will quite literally rip you apart.

Avosound's official advice when working with wild animals is to be extremely cautious––your life might just depend on it.

Unless you actually raised a baby tiger in your backyard, you will probably need the help of an animal trainer or tamer to capture these sounds.

In this video, Rob Nokes shows us how to make sound recordings of a tiger. For this, he hands the microphone to an trainer whose scent the animal is familiar with. A second trainer tells the tiger to make noises (e.g. growling) on command.

Please be advised that tigers are generally not familiar with microphones and might consider them a snack.

Sounddogs tiger video: Recording sounds from a tiger

Sound recordings of a caged tiger

Alternatively, you can also record through the bars of an 'open' cage––although you might find that the microphone picks up too much of the space/room, which is not always a good thing (the recordings will be tainted by spatial reflections). Recordings in cages and interiors are therefore not always usable because of the improper room tone that even untrained ears can pick up on.

Sounddogs sound recording with a tiger in his cage.
Sounddogs Picture: He only wants to play! Sounddogs records a tiger in his cage.

Hence picking the right recording location is paramount. A circus or zoo with an outdoor compound is better suited for the purpose (although background noise can become an issue with such locations).

Once again, let us remind you to please be careful. Field recordists like to get close to the action to capture direct recordings. But if you get too close to a cage, the animal might be able to grab and maul you. If you don't believe us, take a look at The Revenant: that's how unpleasant an encounter with a bear can get!

Recording a reindeer

Sounddogs Video: Rob Nokes records reindeers in Windswept Ranch

No matter whether you are recording a horse, a camel, a donkey, a cow or a reindeer, the process is generally very similar. This Sounddogs video clearly demonstrates how Rob Nokes records the sounds of a reindeer.

When animals wear bridles or harnesses, it is often possible to attach small wireless microphones and/or a small recording device to them. This is exactly what Rob did with one of the reindeers.

Please note how close to the animals Rob gets with his microphone. Again, this is highly dependent on the type of animal you're dealing with. Let us remind you of the dangers of dealing with animals: even horses can be quite sneaky and take a bite out of you; or an angry ram might suddenly decide to charge you...

In the Sounddogs video, however, you can clearly see that Rob is able to enter the compound because the animals are trusting and relaxed.

Recording animal sound effects

It is up to the field recordist to decide how far he/she wants to push the boundaries. When dealing with animals, there is a line that should not be crossed––for even animals deserve respect. If you intend to record a growling or hissing noise, you should think about how to achieve this without putting too much stress on the animal. For example, both domestic cats and cats of prey respond well to items made of fur or wool because these trigger their natural hunting instinct.

Recording animal sound effects

In order to make recordings of animals you will need a lot of practice, skill and experience with animals, sound equipment and locations. For example, if you want to record owls in the wild, you will need a lot of resilience. You will need to know where these animals live and during which season of the year they are active. More importantly, you will need a lot of luck.

Sounddogs Video: Rob Nokes attempts to record the rare Kopeka bird on Cook Island.

The video below shows Rob Nokes attempting to record a Kopeka bird. This 2006 video is a bit shaky and was made before the advent of high-end cell phone cameras. Nevertheless, it gives us a good impression of how arduous it can be to record even a single animal sound.

Together with an experienced guide, Rob scouts for the ideal location––a place devoid of crowds, traffic or other background noise.

As the Kopeka bird likes to nest in caves, Rob attaches a microphone near the nest in the cave (at a distance from the birds themselves, as they would otherwise stay away). With a handheld microphone he records the birds from his standing position. If you have enough audio channels and space, we would also recommended placing an additional ambient microphone (in stereo or in a surround-array) in the cave.